1003 Sister

Thought that some of the Loungers might enjoy a few photos of the JLC 849 movement.  Doc, I was moved to post these by your observation that with the "death" of the ebauche, there is little discussion anymore of how different companies interpret and modify the same base movement.

Any thoughts/opinions/technical observations on how the 1003 compares with this version of the movement?

1003 Sister

1003 Sister

1003 Sister

1003 Sister

Would welcome your thoughts!

Best,

GaryG
I do prefer the bridge lay out of cal 1003 even though
03/09/2009 - 19:57

both are quite similar. Cal 1003 was launched about 20 years prior to JLC cal 849 (1955 vs 1975 for the JLC which in fact was born cal 839 and changed its name to cal 849 in 1994) In terms of thickness the cal 1003 was 1.64mm thick whereas I belive that cal 849 os slightly above 1.80mm.

So cal 849 isn't reall the ebauche for cal 1003 which was exclusive to AP (cal 2003) and VC. However VC will shortly launch a cal 1003 made 100% in house, stay tuned....  

YESSSSS......
03/09/2009 - 20:46
Best news I've heard so far this year...do we have a date??  Cal 1120 soon to follow??
you can consider in a way that cal 1120 will
03/10/2009 - 11:16
also follow. I really can't say much more but you'lle be the 1st to hear it
Re: I do prefer the bridge lay out of cal 1003 even though
03/09/2009 - 23:40
OOOOKKKayyy!! BTW, Chopard also has a calibre that looks quite similar to the 1003. but I don't know whether its in house or based on the VC or JLC movements. Regards, Joseph
My mistake!
03/10/2009 - 00:42
Alex -- Thanks for the correction -- my fault for reading the results of my Internet search too quickly!  I actually did search to try to ascertain whether the 839 was the basis for the 1003, and thought that I had found confirmation -- but a re-reading of the review (by ei8htohms) reveals that in my haste I combined two sentences together.  As you note, the 1003/2003 pre-figured the 839 by many years, although the 1003 was (unless I've read it too quickly again!) also a JLC development. I'll be very eager to see the "new" VC 1003 as it's developed -- thanks again for the (correct) info. Best, GaryG
One additional tiny thing
03/10/2009 - 07:23
My understanding is that when JLC changed the designation from 839 to 849 there were also some small improvements made to the movement design (I think that I read this in the classic Walt Odets review). Best, GaryG
a narrow response...
03/10/2009 - 02:41
As Alex pointed out, the 849 is not strictly speaking comparable to the 1003. But the point I'd like to make is much broader than either of those movements. I find the trend amongst many mid to high-end watch companies to pepper their movements with blued screws to be very unfortunate. I'm all for some contrast, but many of these recent designs are, to my eye, overkill. I find that it actually devalues the look of the movements, as the (overly) eye-catching color distracts from their finer nuances. In the past, with all of the great (AP, PP and V&C) calibers, the polished steel head screws provided a more subtle contrast, which both complimented the beauty of the plate layout and the rubis, and naturally led the eye to the (often) beautifully finished countersinks. It is true, of course, that this a subjective topic, but as my aesthetic judgment is widely considered to be impeccable... That was a joke. But seriously, I prefer understated beauty, and have the impression that, like certain women we have all known, too many watch companies are applying too much make-up to their movements in a strained effort to attract attention. Regards, Tony C.
Interesting thoughts on blued screws
03/10/2009 - 07:21
I certainly see your point, Tony, and it seems true that the Geneva style in general eschews the use of blued screws.   Even Jaeger, who are pretty well identified with the use of heat-treated bluing, do not appear to have used blued screws extensively prior to about 1990 -- and even today (or at least as recently as my 2004 book of movements) do not use them in all movements.  As someone who started buying JLC pieces in the 90s, I tend to associate the blued screws with their house style and have come to like them. Of course, in the Saxon style blued screws are commonly used -- and I find it tough to accuse Lange, for instance, of straining to attract attention.  The excellent Dresden independent Marco Lang also blues his movement screws, and over in Motiers even Kari offered the Cal. 27 with blued screws adorning the regulator dial (although he would do silver screws on request). What I don't like is when you flip over a watch and there are a bunch of poorly blued screws visible with silver slots -- showing that the manufacturer didn't even care enough to use some abrasive in the slot so that it would take on the color.  Blecch... Best, GaryG
I agree Tony as much as the blued screws can look good on
03/10/2009 - 11:28
the Saxon movements from GO and Lange I really think they are overkill on the Swiss/Geneva movements. They look more as an afterthoght and don't fit well. On the other hand nicely polished screws are so much more difficult and time consuming than blued screws....
Blued vs Polished
03/10/2009 - 16:19
Please correct me if I'm wrong but I believe bluing was used to temper the screws in days past and before modern alloys.  Screws were the part that would be subject to damage from servicing thus bluing them by heat treatment made sense.  Polishing, OTOH, was for corrosion resistance, again in the days when metals were of simpler alloys. Nowadays, I think most bluing is accomplished with chemicals and even (gasp) painting!  Bluing and polishing have become decorative statements rather than horological necessities.  So now we see that certain brands have staked their claim to certain decorative looks.