Is this 4072 ok?

Hi

I am not an expert on the 4072. Can you tell me if this dial is original?

 

regards

John

The only ones who can tell with certainty
04/28/2015 - 01:59

are the experts at VC following inspection.  Really can't tell based on one picture but it looks pretty good to my old eyes cool.  This model is very desirable and should come with an official certificate of authenticity from VC if the seller wants good money.  That way you can be assured about the whole watch and not just the dial!

The only ones who can tell with certainty

Re: The only ones who can tell with certainty
04/28/2015 - 10:22

Ok, thanks.

How can I check if the case number and movement number are matching. The movement seems to be marked in all the right places, but I am not sure if case and movement are matching?

 

regards

John

ooh that's agreat combo, love steel/RG together! Can you give me the
04/28/2015 - 10:37

case and movement numbers and I will check

Re: ooh that's agreat combo, love steel/RG together! Can you give me the
04/28/2015 - 11:17

Hi

 

movement is 437690, case is 273572

 

regards

John

numbers match a piece from 1946
04/29/2015 - 17:45

.

Re: numbers match a piece from 1946
04/29/2015 - 19:39

Ok and thanks

John

And don't forget the beautiful blue hands.
04/28/2015 - 13:11

Definitely the icing on that delicious cake!

Re: The only ones who can tell with certainty
04/30/2015 - 13:35

Forgive my ignorance but could someone please explain what the 2 small dials and all those small numbers just inside the bezel are for.

I'd imagine they are for seconds but why does anyone need 3?

Dave

This chronograph
04/30/2015 - 14:39

The subdial at 9 o'clock is the sub-seconds dial, which is always in motion when the watch is running.

The large, blue, seconds hand measures the seconds, and the subdial at 3 o'clock is a "totalizer", that measures up to 30 minutes of elapsed time when you activate the chronograph function.

The printed scale around the circumference of this particular dial is a literal tachometer, (aka, a speedometer), measuring speed.  It is calibrated as Base 1000, so:

Imagine you want to time the speed of a car.  You activate the chrono when the car starts and stop the chrono after the car has travelled 1,000 meters. 

If the car completes the 1,000 meters in 60 seconds or less, than you can read the speed of the car directly from the calibration numbers printed around the circumference of the dial.

An example, say you travel 1,000 meters in exactly 60 seconds...the large seconds hand would make one complete revolution and point to "60", which would be 60km/hour (or 1km/minute).

If you travel 1,000 meters in less than 60 seconds, lets say 40 seconds, then your speed would be 90km/hour.

Re: This chronograph
04/30/2015 - 16:38

Hi Dan

Thank you for the explanation; I am now an enlightened one. ;-)

There is still much to learn; one of the nicest things about this blog is the willingness of members to share their knowledge.

Dave