Can you tell me more about this 1920s V&C?

I recently found out my father inherited a V&C from his grandfather and that he gave it to a watchmaker about 12 years a go. The watchmaker then sent the case to a jewler and, as luck would have it, suffered a severe stroke and shut down the business. I've done some research and after managing to get hold of both the watchmaker and jewler, it turns out the movement is gone but the jewler still has the case!   I was there today and took some pictures. It is a "cushion shaped" gold V&C watch with the following no:  241979 It also has the name of my grandfather and date 8th of Feb 1921 inscribed on the back, so it has to be built before that :). It measures about 29 mm outside and 24 mm inside. Here are some pictures:
Can you tell me more about this 1920s V&C?

Can you tell me more about this 1920s V&C?

Can you tell me more about this 1920s V&C?
    My thought was now if it would be possible to maybe get hold of a similar V&C watch and put the movement inside this one? What do you guys think; are the watches of this time "mass produced" enought that that would work? And is Ebay my best bet for finding an old V&C?   I asked my dad and he recalls the watch looked something like this:
Can you tell me more about this 1920s V&C?
(
from Ebay)  
Why ruin two watches?
10/13/2011 - 05:43

Your initiative and interest in family history is wonderful, and just knowing your grandfather had the sophistication to own an early wristwatch and a V&C at that, is impressive.  However, there are many pitfalls with what you are considering IMHO.  First and foremost, swapping cases and movements will result in a mismatched watch that cannot be considered genuine.  Secondly, your case has been badly repaired and requires some restoration itself.  Add the cost of service and restoration of any substitute movement you can find, hopefully with an intact dial and hands, otherwise good luck obtaining them too!  It will be a difficult chore, but not impossible with patience and a great deal of knowledge.  In the end, however, you will only have a faux momento as the watch won't be original or authentic frown. May I suggest another route?  If you have other items of personl property from your grandfather, such as a photograph, penknife, straight razor, etc., why not make a display box or cabinet vignette that includes this watch case and features the engraved back.  I have something similar for my grandfather.  

have to agree with Dean on this. shame what happened to your
10/13/2011 - 11:05
grandfather's watch frown
Re: have to agree with Dean on this. shame what happened to your
10/13/2011 - 15:13
Hi guys, Thanks for your quick replies! I appreciate your thoughts and I realize that the project might not be worth the effort, but I thought I'd at least do some more reseach before I give up! You have a valid point that it won't be a 100% genuine V&C, but the watch would still mean a lot to me. The jeweler told me she knew an expert on old gold watches here in Stockholm, so I should be able to find people that can do a good job. So, before I give up:   Is there any way for me to find out anything more about the watch? Does V&C keep some kind of database with all watches produced? And if I did manage to find a watch from that time at a reasonable price (maybe also with a broken/damaged case?), do you think the movement will fit? Or is each watch too "unique"?   P.s. It was my great-grandfather's watch :)
your big problem would be finding a pocket watch movement as
10/13/2011 - 18:26
the case had a pocket watch movement (which explains the little pusher under the hole where the crown is supposed to be. You would also need to find a right sized dial. All this will be long and certainly costly. I would suggest giving your case to a good watchmaker and he can set out looking for a movement.
Re: your big problem would be finding a pocket watch movement as
10/16/2011 - 23:44
Ah, so it was originally a pocket watch? I guess that makes sense since the gold smith said something about being surprised about how the "mounts" for the straps went into the case. Is it the case that all watches with this extra pusher (does it have a name?) are old pocket watches? Can the case number I gave before give us any information? Does each case get a unique number or is it rather a model number? Is it for example possible to figure out the manufacturing year via this? Also, do you guys have any idea on how "unique" each watch was at this time? If I find a watch from around the same time that has the same shape and the outside measurements seem to match, is it likely that the movements will be the same? Or is each V&C from this time more or less unique? Thanks again for your help!
Re: Re: your big problem would be finding a pocket watch movement as
10/16/2011 - 23:53
Ah, found the answer to my question regarding serial number here: http://ticktalk.shawwebspace.ca/... (still curious though if I can figure out the manufacturing year via this?)
Case numbers
10/17/2011 - 22:44
Your piece was considered "manufactured" when the case and movement were joined to complete the watch.  As the cases and movements were made seperately, possibly in different years, the case number alone cannot give you the date of manufacture.  However, I believe it would be more accurate to estimate the year of manufacture by the case number alone than the movement number alone.  Vintage movements can have a longer shelf-life before being completed.  I have one that was 15 years in storage before being cased!
Re: Case numbers
10/18/2011 - 21:10
Ah, that it is interesting. I had a look through your home page again and found the list with case numbers and years. You list: 1895-1900        217 000 to 255 000   This watch is within that span, which seems a bit weird since it has 1921 inscribed on it. However since it seems someone has converted it from a pocket watch to a wrist watch (is it always the case that this extra pusher below the crown means it's a pocket watch?) I suppose it might have been used before my great grandfather got it.  
the movement was from a pocket watch but the case is from the
10/19/2011 - 14:08
20s. It was not unusual at the time to use pocket watch movements in wrist watches
Never try to make a watch of it!
10/13/2011 - 21:21
Make a medaillon, with perhaps a pic of your grandfather, and give it to your wife, daughter or granddaughter! In that case the family history vill be preserved for the future! The one who gets it will be happy for life!heart I gave my daughter a medaillon some years ago, she is 29 yeras old now, and will get married next year. Inside the little medaillon, she has two pics,  one of her fiance, and one of our two dogs ! laugh Cheers Doc