Exhibition vs Solid Case back

Hi

Just a question:

Is the Exhibition case back less antimagnetic than the solid one?

Dave

While I am no technical expert, I will try and answer this. I think the answer
05/14/2015 - 17:19

differes whether in the context of VC or other brands.

For example, a VC with exhibition caseback (Traditionelle with cal 4400) might be marginally less antimagnetic than a VC with solid-case back (Patrimony with cal 1400) (I am not sure); but definitely much less anti-magnetic than the Overseas. But then the Overseas is anti-magnetic because the movement is in a Faraday cage, so the magnetic protection is due to that rather than the exhibition or solid caseback (again  I think this is the case).

I think Omega has pioneered the use of anti-magetic materials / components and some of their movements are completely anti-magnetic while being exposed in an exhibition caseback.

I hope I make a bit of sense. I am sure others will correct me and answer your question more accurately.

Re: While I am no technical expert, I will try and answer this. I think the answer
05/15/2015 - 03:35

Thank you for your detailed response; I had no idea the Overseas movement is in a Faraday cage; I find that quite interesting.

When I was buying my Sinn EZM 10 I initially wanted to buy one with an exhibition caseback but was told it would be less antimagnetic so I opted for the solid. I often wonder how much difference it actually makes and since reading more about the Sinn I'm wishing I'd bought the exhibition caseback. Maybe I'll switch mine up.

Lots to learn; fabulous passtime, watches. (bad pun)

Dave

 

 

The Faraday Cage in the OS is really a soft iron surround that "encases" the movement
05/15/2015 - 05:03

I believe the sold back is part of the Faraday Cage design on the OS.  It essentially allows the magnetic field to travel along a "path of least resistance" and thus going around/avoiding the movement, thereby providing protection.

This is the traditional method of making a watch "anti-magnetic" to a certain level, especially when traditional balance and escapement materials are used.  Modern methods (used by Rolex, Omega, etc.) rely on using amagnetic materials to begin with for balance/escapement components...therefore not needing a Faraday Cage design and making the use of a see-through back a non-issue.

BR, Dan

Re: The Faraday Cage in the OS is really a soft iron surround that "encases" the movement
05/16/2015 - 03:26

Thank you, Dan, for the additional information. I am finding that the more I learn the more there is to learn and there seems to be an inexhaustible reservoir of information out there. 

Dave

 

Dave, I recommend you get yourself a copy of the latest Watchtime, June
05/16/2015 - 06:22

Issue, where the cover story is on the new Omega Seamaster 300, which has the new Omega anti-magnetic movement and transparent caseback.  

Also, there is a two page spread on VC Harmony series.

Re: Dave, I recommend you get yourself a copy of the latest Watchtime, June
05/16/2015 - 13:43

Thank you for the suggestion; I will have a look at the article.

Dave

V&C was a pioneer in antimagnetic escapements
05/16/2015 - 08:02

Further to Dan's comments on the use of antimagnetic materials in the watch movement itself, Vacheron & Constantin has a long history of involvement with antimagnetic movement construction.  As documented in Secrets of Vacheron Constantin by Cologni, in 1846 V&C experimented with bronze balance springs and wheels.  In 1862 they joined a research group seeking new materials which eventually led them to the pioneering work of Charles Auguste Paillard with palladium.  

By 1885 they were retailing antimagnetic watches.  Here you can see a V&C movement bearing an 1888 patent date, with a bronze counterpoised lever and palladium hairspring.

V&C was a pioneer in antimagnetic escapements

Late in the 19th century palladium was surpassed by nickel/steel alloys, first provided to V&C by Constant Crausaz, then Charles Edouard Guillaume.

 

 

Re: V&C was a pioneer in antimagnetic escapements
05/16/2015 - 13:46

Nice photo! Thank you for this information. You have inspired me to read further. 

Dave