Haven't put up any new photos of this one in a while

But having taken a few yesterday, I can't imagine why not!

Haven't put up any new photos of this one in a while

Haven't put up any new photos of this one in a while

This piece is a great joy to wear -- and fun to photograph, too :-)

Hope you enjoyed!

Best,

GaryG
Gulp!
08/23/2012 - 05:44
Yeah, I kinda like that one, Gary. That has to be one of the most beautiful VCs ever. Best, Robert
Re: Gulp!
08/24/2012 - 02:42
Thanks, Robert -- this watch is fairly challenging to shoot, but at the same time I do love wearing it and studying it! Best, Gary
VC really is the best at skeletonization
08/23/2012 - 10:05
and you caputured it amazingly Gary!  yesheart. I love SteveG's photos, but you are not behind...and this is before your "apprenticeship" with the professional photographer is completed smiley
Now that's a compliment!
08/24/2012 - 02:43
SteveG was and is a role model of mine photographically, so to be mentioned in the same sentence with him is quite a privilege.  Lots of lessons to go in my apprenticeship! Best, Gary
Gary your photo skills have gone from really good to astounding in
08/23/2012 - 11:37
just a year!!!! yes
It's the lessons...
08/24/2012 - 02:41
Alex -- thanks!  As Dan mentions, I've undertaken a series of "correspondence school" lessons with Ming Thein to improve my skills.  I've now gotten two series of feedback from him, and painful as it has been to understand how many flaws there are in my technique, the improvement has been quite visible to many folks including yourself. Never let it be said that studying technique "ruins" creativity or the quality of the final product! Best, Gary
Awesome shots...
08/23/2012 - 18:49
Superb subject; stunning photography. Best, Paul
Thanks, Paul
08/24/2012 - 02:44
...and here's to building a vibrant community across Internet sites! All the best, Gary
Thanks GaryG for having taken the time to make such
08/23/2012 - 23:29
beautiful shots of your skeleton watch.  I would like to ask you as couple of questions and I hope you will share some of your tricks concerning making the photo. 1: Have you removed the glass? 2: If not, how have you managed to avoid the shine in the glass from the lamps? 3: How many lamps have you used in the set up to get these pictures? I have listed a couple of close up from my skeleton watch, not for competing but for learning.   Yours sincerely KBS
Re: Thanks GaryG for having taken the time to make such
08/24/2012 - 01:19
@KBS To avoid the hard light from a a flash you build a light box. The light will be much softer. yes Random pic taken from the internets
Thanks Solaris for your input.
08/24/2012 - 21:36
I already have one of those tents and the extra lights. Yours sincerely KBS
Re: Thanks GaryG for having taken the time to make such
08/24/2012 - 02:38
Thank you for asking!  Here are a few comments that I hope are helpful: 1.  I do use a light tent (with fixed lights rather than flashes) to soften the lighting on the crystal.  The crystal is definitely still on the watch in these photos.  I have to play around quite a bit with the angle of the camera to the watch and the lights to the watch in order to eliminate (as much as possible) unwanted reflections.  2. I also use a circular polarizing filter to reduce/eliminate glare from the crystal.  This is a mixed blessing, as using the polarizer along with the other tricks on light and camera placement also tends to make it difficult to see how blue the hands are!  Takes a lot of playing around to get a good set up.  Finally, you can achieve a fair amount with post-processing in Photoshop or similar programs -- isolating the dial of the watch and increasing contrast and brightness allows you to start with an image that is less brightly lit (with less glare) and still end up with a bright looking final image.  3.  I used two lamps for these photos -- one on the left of the tent and one on the right -- and turned off all other lights in the room (which can give some strange color casts to the image if left on).  Hope that's useful! Best, GaryG
Thanks GaryG for making such a detailed description.
08/24/2012 - 21:38
I went straight to a photo-shop near me and bought a “circular polarizing filter”. I think I have tried ( not mastered necessarily  ) more or less the rest you are mentioning, so this might help me. I had never heard of such a device before you wrote about it. I’m looking forward to seeing more of your beautiful pictures of your outstanding watches. Yours sincerely KBS
My pleasure
08/24/2012 - 22:48
I may not have been clear with one minor (but critical) thing about the circular polarizer -- once you have the shot set up, rotate the filter (it should be constructed in such a way that it spins easily without unscrewing from the lens).  You should see that the image in your viewfinder gets darker and lighter as you go, and the reflected light will be minimized at a specific spot.  Then, shoot away!  Be careful to do this last -- especially if you have a tilt-shift lens or another lens that rotates as you focus it, the filter will rotate with it and you will lose your desired spot! I'll look forward to seeing your next photos! Best, GaryG
Thanks for the time you have taken to answer my questions.
08/28/2012 - 00:46
This is the best so far, can be a lot better and there is a long way to go still. However you have been very helpful and I’m enjoying learning from looking at your pictures. Yours sincerely KBS
These are great!
08/28/2012 - 02:26
I am very pleased that my comments were useful to you.  Hope you don't mind, but I downloaded the first image and did a bit more post-processing to remove most of the remaining glare from the upper right hand area of the movement, as well as to sharpen the lower right edge of the rotor a bit: Strictly a matter of personal taste as to whether you like a bit of reflection from the crystal or not, but I just wanted to demonstrate that it is possible to use post-processing selectively to help with scattered light.  Again, hope this does not offend. Keep them coming!  One thing that my teacher has stressed with me is moving the lights farther away from the tent and covering them with pieces of white paper to reduce the intensity of lighting, helping to get rid of hot spots of bright light on the bezels.  I now have a bunch of sheets of paper taped up everywhere (including on the outside of the tent) and use hand-held sheets to throw shadows on remaining hot spots.  All the best, GaryG
keep 'em coming!
08/28/2012 - 11:14
.
Dear GaryG, you have certainly not offended me.
08/28/2012 - 23:50
After three days of shooting and still not being able to get rid of the reflection in the crystals, then it’s just pure magic to see it gone.  Brilliant! The appearance of the watch is just so much more balanced without the reflection in the glass in the right upper corner.  I didn’t know it’s possible to remove the reflection in the glass without distorting the movement underneath the glass.  I do not have Photoshop so I have just used “Windows Live Photo” for my editing.  Not quite sure it has that feature. It’s interesting with the sheets of papers you are mentioning. I have given up on my light tent and I’m only using papers and the reflections from a white painted bookcase/shelf I have.  I will try to use the tent again and see if it starts working better with the papers added.     If you have time then I would like to see what you can do about the following two pictures with post editing. PLEASE just say enough when it’s enough. I’m a bit like a little kid in a candy store at the moment because of the tips you are giving. Both pictures were taken without a circular polarizing filter and I only used one lamp. Picture one: 1: There is a shadow underneath the moon (automatic) area. Can it be removed? 2: Can you make the dial/picture appear more brilliant? It seems a bit grey but the details seem fine as far as I can see.  Second picture: I think the picture has reminiscences to something nostalgic (maybe 1952). There are lots of things in the picture I don’t like, but somehow I feel it has a story to tell. 1: Can you remove the shade on the dial ? 2: Can you make the dial brighter without doing anything to the case and the strap ?  Remember you should only do this if you think it’s fun. I’m just curious to see what’s possible in the post editing process.  Your sincerely KBS
Dear KBS
08/29/2012 - 05:49
I hope you don't mind others taking advantage of your generosity to improve the Toledo photo. Gary is certainly right. Set-up is everything. "Measure twice, cut once" as they say in woodworking. The time spent in getting the angles and lighting just so seems tedious but the experimentation is a real learning process and ultimately makes things easier on each iteration. The great thing about digital (and I was a late comer, prefering film,,I still have 3 film cameras) is you can take an almost infinite number of photos and get instant feedback. It's an immense help. BTW, there's a hidden VC logo in the guilloché pattern of the Toedo. I've posted it on one of the other threads. One thing you can try, although it's a little "kludgy' it you have only 1 light is to get a small flashlihgt with a fucussing bean (narrow and wide) and wrap a handkerchief aroud the light to diffuse it. By varying the beam you can highlight parts or all of the object such as the dial. (Just a suggestion) Good luck!yes
Thanks JB for taking the time to post a reply.
08/30/2012 - 01:08
I will certainly try your suggestion with one light and the handkerchief. It was just on those photos I tried with one lamp. Sometimes I use two, other times three lamps. It‘s nice to experiment smiley So I think that it’s great to have different options. Your handkerchief is a new idea for me so that I will have to try. Can you remember what thread your photo with the hidden VC logo in the guilloché pattern of the Toledo is?  Or could you maybe repost it here? I would very much like to see it. I wish you a nice day/evening. KBS
Toledo
08/30/2012 - 16:40
Hi Kent, I don't recall which thread it was, but I will send you some pics of my Toledo by email tonight if I have a chance. Otherwise early next week. Best regards, Joseph
I will give it a try!
09/02/2012 - 10:09
Sorry for the slow response, but I have been traveling this week in Asia on business so quite busy. It will be fun to take an attempt at your two photos! Please give me a few days. I am also just today installing a new home computer so it may take a bit of time. Removing shadows is not yet a strong skill of mine, but I can fairly easily isolate the dials and increase brightness and contrast. I will include a few notes along with the revised images (assuming that I have some success) Best, GaryG
Re: Thanks GaryG for having taken the time to make such
08/24/2012 - 02:38
Thank you for asking!  Here are a few comments that I hope are helpful: 1.  I do use a light tent (with fixed lights rather than flashes) to soften the lighting on the crystal.  The crystal is definitely still on the watch in these photos.  I have to play around quite a bit with the angle of the camera to the watch and the lights to the watch in order to eliminate (as much as possible) unwanted reflections.  2. I also use a circular polarizing filter to reduce/eliminate glare from the crystal.  This is a mixed blessing, as using the polarizer along with the other tricks on light and camera placement also tends to make it difficult to see how blue the hands are!  Takes a lot of playing around to get a good set up.  Finally, you can achieve a fair amount with post-processing in Photoshop or similar programs -- isolating the dial of the watch and increasing contrast and brightness allows you to start with an image that is less brightly lit (with less glare) and still end up with a bright looking final image.  3.  I used two lamps for these photos -- one on the left of the tent and one on the right -- and turned off all other lights in the room (which can give some strange color casts to the image if left on).  Hope that's useful! Best, GaryG