A pocket watch

I am not a collector nor a conoisseur, so I beg your pardon if I am out of place in this forum and if I break some etiquette rule I ignore.

I have seen that there are other people asking questions about watches they own, and that is exactly the reason for which I have subscribed.

Mine is pocket watch which, considering the history of my family, should presumably go back to the XIXth  century. The most obvious question is if it appears to be an original Vacheron Constantin or a fake, but of course I will appreciate any other information you may give me.

I attach a few pictures and realize I forgot to mention that I also am no photographer

Regards

 

 

A pocket watch

PRB
07/27/2015 - 21:59
PRB
07/27/2015 - 22:03
PRB
07/27/2015 - 22:05
07/27/2015 - 23:56
PRB
07/28/2015 - 11:22
07/28/2015 - 16:15
PRB
07/28/2015 - 21:00
Re: A pocket watch
07/27/2015 - 22:03

Sorry, but I have not managed to attach more than one photo, so here a second post

 A pocket watch

Re: Re: A pocket watch
07/27/2015 - 22:05

… and a third post, the last one

Thanks and Regards to all

 A pocket watch

Sweet! Circa 1830
07/27/2015 - 23:56

The dial and movement are unsigned, however, the cuvette looks correct.  Serial number 26632 places it about 1830 and the 4-jewel cylinder escapement is appropriate for simple V&C's of that date.  The cursive script for Vacheron & Constantin may throw some off, but is also found on some production of the period.  The case looks wonderful and might be the real asset of this piece if fired champleve enamel and not cold painted decoration, but hard to tell from your photo.  If you can find someone more confident with a camera, it would be a real treat so have some clear large pictures heart.  

Because the movement is unsigned and pretty basic, it could be the work of anyone.  Hope you appreciate that you cannot get absolute answers based upon what you have given us at this time.  The only guaranteed confirmation of authenticity will come from VC examining the piece, although they can check the numbers against their registry and you should also confirm the same numbers on the cuvette appear underneath the base plate, but that requires disassembly surprise.

BTW, what is the size?

Re: Sweet! Circa 1830
07/28/2015 - 11:22

Thank you both — I mean also Dan — for the info. Funny because I had thought of using “sweet pocket watch” as a title for the discussion, but then I figured that "sweet" didn't sound very professional. 

Anyway, I had thought about having VC expertise the watch, but I also figured that It probably isn't cheap -– as far as I know, cheap and Switzerland don't ever appear in the same sentence — but I thought it might be better to first know if the watch had some chance of being a true VC: I am sure I can trust the opinion of someone with a nick so cute as tick-talk. Anyway, as I would be really unconfortable with sending the watch by courier and I don't plan to go to Geneva soon, getting VC's expertise will take quite a while.

As you may well imagine, I do not intend to open the watch, the mere idea of doing it make my hands shake, so I may not answer your question about numbers. Also I don't know much about different types of enamel. The date, 1830 ca, fits perfectly with family history. I have one question: rather than a pocket watch, would this not be a ladies pendant watch?

I haven't yet found anyone more confident with a camera, but thanks to daylight I have obtained better results with my ipad: hope you enjoy the new picture and notice how absolutely sweet the rear of the case is. If you care for other ipad daylight photos, please ask. Of course I well understand that I can't expect absolute answers over the net and with such low quality photos.

Best regards to both

Much better, thanks
07/28/2015 - 16:15

OK, it seems much clearer that your case decoration is indeed champleve enamel.  You will find the identical pattern on a V&C of 1828 on pg. 38 of Cologni's Secrets of Vacheron Constantin, on a piece with jump hour complication.  I love it! 

My question on size was directed at the possibility that yours is a ladies pendant or chatelaine watch.  Can you also share if the box is marked in any manner? 

 

Re: Much better, thanks
07/28/2015 - 21:00

Please Tick Talk, it is not you who should thank me but I am the one who must to thank you very much: in less than 24 hours I have passed from wondering if the watch was a fake to realizing my very old mother has given me a little treasure. I am even beginning to wonder what I should do with it because I regularly forget the weekly winding of a couple of old clocks I have and remembering to wind the tiny little key of this watch every evening – if I were to have it fixed – would imply a deep change in my habits, something I might be a little too old to confront. And leaving it in its box at the bottom of a drawer as it has been for around a century appears unfair to the artisans who made it.

Sorry I forgot about the dimensions in my previous post: the watch has a diameter of 4 centimeters. And no, the box has no markings on it.I am truly flattered to think that you love my little VC.Thank you again.

Very Interesting watch PRB!
07/28/2015 - 07:24

Tick-Talk is our forum's resident expert on V&C pocketwatches, so I would heed his advice.

As a family heirloom, it might be worth it for you to have the watch sent to VC in Geneva to obtain a Certificate of Authenticity.  VC would physically inspect the watch, but a Certificate would let you know 100% that it is authentic.  The year of manufacture would also be confirmed.

A simpler Extract from the Archives can be obtained by providing the watch's case and movement serial numbers.  The watch would not be required to be shipped to Geneva.  But as already mentioned, for your watch, it would require partial disassembly to access the movement's serial number.

If you do find more information about your watch from VC, please share it with us.

Welcome to THL.  Best Regards, Dan

Re: Re: Re: A pocket watch
07/28/2015 - 21:33

It is a beautiful watch! Thank you for sharing these photos.

Dave