A smile for today :-)

A smile for today :-)

Courtesy of a local latte artist A smile for today :-)
Here's one more for Valentines Day :o)
02/11/2011 - 07:31
Also courtesy of a local latte artist (and taken with my lousy cellphone). Have a great weekend guys! Kazumi
Kazumi my friend for Valentine's day I suggest
02/11/2011 - 10:09
something closer to this courtesy of Harry Winston! You guys have latte artists, I can't even find a decent espresso
I am sure that would win over the special lady's heart...
02/11/2011 - 16:05

but I still have to leave some of my budget for the wife! Shhhhh! LOL,  Kazumi

I think Kazumi will look silly in that....
02/11/2011 - 16:08
and I agree that Geneva has horrible coffee. :-) Bill
I'd order one of those.
02/11/2011 - 17:58
And I don't even drink lattes! Dean's was pretty impressive, too.
Alex decides to stir things by throwing his wallet in the air....
02/11/2011 - 21:48
Alex, my beautiful young lady has seen your post and would like to meet you over a coffee. Oh! don't forget to bring along the necklace.... You've set the pace mate...over to you! Have a wonderful Valentine Weekend. Tony
Thanks Dean for a good start of my night!
02/12/2011 - 02:20
Last night to bed at 2:30 up at 7:30 and out with the boys! Snowy and ice on the water, they look long for spring! I never sleep more than 5 hours. I have never done.No watch can be as expensive as our time! Today it happenned again. 'Life is a series of coincidences' ! I havebeen looking intensly for a sextant, at least 4 months. After 50 years of sailing, handling a sextant is the only thing I can't. Yes. I have a GPS, but it's NOT a sextant. So I got to get one. I searched every where, to find a decent second hand. A good one, second hand is: rare expensive hard to get and often found in USA, with shipping, tolls etc So I decided to forget it yesterday at about this time. When I came inside with the dogs I stumbled on an advertisement for 'new' from 1987, never used, of that brand I was seeking to a price about a third of what it cost new. Best of all, it's only 140 km from here, these things should not be transported by careless people, instead by sextant-lovers Fetching it on Sunday, which wil be tomorrow, wow! You could say it's an Omega among the sextants, a VC would cost as much as a good watch! So this yesterday was my smiling day, Dean. I'm sure you felt it! Watches, what's that? Real men use a sextant! Take care Dean and get a sextant fast, a Freiberger Doc
You have my admiration Doc...
02/12/2011 - 06:29
Deciding to learn new things is always very good, and keeps us young , but to learn how to use a sextant is very brave!  Considering that you very life will depend on it in the open ocean, I can only admire your desire to experience sailing as a purist.  Once I am satisfied with pocket watches, I will have to get a pocket sextant .
Hi Dean!
02/12/2011 - 15:04
Never seen before! I wonder how good it works, I only read about them, but never hold them in my hands! With a good ordinary sextant you should be able, rather a real pro should, to get inside 1/10 of a sea mile, OTH, if a tiny pocket version would give you a position missing some miles, it would be impressing, Have to check it up! Have a nice weekend! Doc
Shipboard chronometers
02/14/2011 - 04:07
Gentlemen, I recall from my watch officer days in the US Navy that the sextant is only as accurate as the chronometer on board the ship. VC made many and they were housed in a safe location at the navigator's station.  The navigator used a repeating stop watch (VC made these as well) to mimic the chronometer when shooting the sun at noon to determine position.  And don't forget the navigation tables.  I think time, tables, a clear sky, and expert use of the sextant are needed to determine accurate position.  Robert
Here is my Deck Watch - sorry, not a VC
02/14/2011 - 08:26
But it is a very nice, and accurate, Hamilton Model 22 Deck Watch.  I think this one wasn't actually used onboard a ship during war time, but was actually military surplus from the US Army Air Force. I believe these were designed and regulated for temperature compensation and dial up only operation. I was lucky enough to get it with its original cardboard box. BR, Dan
Wonderful set, Dan :-) (nt)
02/14/2011 - 18:04
nt
Very, very nice!
02/14/2011 - 18:42
Never seen before! Like the design! Would really like to have one of those. What's their exact name and ref.? No, to be honest 3 good quartz watches of whivh one will be this! It's my Puls watch that I use when I run, year around imn minus 10C and plus 28C, rain, sun or snow. It's absolute magificent. I can't find a pic. I know I published it once, possibly on the old Purist time. Anyhow it ran one yrear without loosing or gaining one second!! I had it pictured beside the PC and the official atom watch GMT! So the watch today would NEVER be a mecahnical movement, risk of destroying. Exspensive. No that watch and my two Swatches would be better than any mechanical watch. WE know that! But the feeling would not be the same. OTH this is more difficult o get this absolute beautiful instrument, was the difficult part! I just love it. Absolute new, never used, and the mark on the back, is unbeatable: made in DDR. It,s cerificate is dated 30/12, 1987, and signed by hand, just barely 2 years before, the great President Reagan said: "Tear this wall down!" Doc
Hi Doc, you have the COOLEST toys, :-)
02/16/2011 - 08:36
That sextant is really a great find, and learning how to use it, The Hamilton Deck Watch's official name is the Model 22.  Steve G. wrote a great piece on it as part of his Deck Chronometer collection.  His collection includes a marvelous VC Deck Watch with the rarer, indirect center-seconds, cal. 166 (most of the ones I see have a sub-seconds hand, using cal 162 and 163).  I'd love to find one of them (Steve, if you ever want to let it go, contact me! ).  Steve's original post is in the Recommended Threads section and here is a link to his article about Marine Deck Chronometers:  http://ninanet.net/watches/others12/Mediums/mdecks.html The Model 22 is a great watch that was very quickly designed by Hamilton for the war effort.  It's fundamentals were based on Hamilton's best railroad pocket watches of the 1930s.  There is a book "The Ship's Chronometer" by Marvin Whitney that has very detailed information about Hamilton's 2 great ship chronometers: the Model 21, which is a "true" Ship's Chronometer as you mentioned and the Model 22 (which was used in both gimbaled form for smaller naval vessel's to use as their primary chronometer AND as a deck watch).  This book also mentions Steve's VC as being specially made for the British Admiralty! The biggest contributions Hamilton made to ship chronometers were probably the American spirit of mass production and interchangeability of parts.  Their engineering and manufacturing expertise allowed for true mass production of Model 21 and Model 22 timepieces that were as accurate as any chronometer of the time AND easy to repair and regulate without the need for many expert watchmaker/regulator specialist to fine tune each timepiece. Best Regards, Dan P.S. Here are some more pictures of the M22:  (I had the watch recently serviced and it is now running at 0.5 sec/day, dial up, for over a week!)
Very, very nice!
02/14/2011 - 18:44
Never seen before! Like the design! Would really like to have one of those. What's their exact name and ref.? No, to be honest 3 good quartz watches of whivh one will be this! It's my Puls watch that I use when I run, year around imn minus 10C and plus 28C, rain, sun or snow. It's absolute magificent. I can't find a pic. I know I published it once, possibly on the old Purist time. Anyhow it ran one yrear without loosing or gaining one second!! I had it pictured beside the PC and the official atom watch GMT! So the watch today would NEVER be a mecahnical movement, risk of destroying. Exspensive. No that watch and my two Swatches would be better than any mechanical watch. WE know that! But the feeling would not be the same. OTH this is more difficult o get this absolute beautiful instrument, was the difficult part! I just love it. Absolute new, never used, and the mark on the back, is unbeatable: made in DDR. It,s cerificate is dated 30/12, 1987, and signed by hand, just barely 2 years before, the great President Reagan said: "Tear this wall down!" Doc
Re: Here is my comparing watch 1942
02/14/2011 - 20:12
Beautiful watch, Dan.  Here is a Hamilton comparing watch made in 1942 with the great cal 23. I bought from a Boilers Technician CPO in 1967 while onboard an aircraft carrier, keel laid in 1946.  Robert
An excellent Hamilton Chronograph!
02/16/2011 - 08:45
Hi Robert, I love your watch, and how you got it - a real navy veteran that I'm sure would have some good stories to tell if it could talk. With your navy experience, and ability to talk, I'm sure you have some GREAT stories! Best Regards, Dan
Of course a chronometer is a must,
02/14/2011 - 18:13
I hope you all read 'Longitude: the illustrated edition by Dava Sobel and Harrison's all troubles. Excellent reading. I should really have this Had it for five years constantly going 2 s late aech 48 hours, eactly! But it's to fragile to bring onboard.... Movement by the master of all, Victor Kullberg! Doc
GO's "New" Marine Chronometer
02/14/2011 - 18:02
Glashutte Original has released a follow-up to last year's Marine Chronometer called the Marine Senator Chronometer, in platinum no less, with Observatory Certificate!  At over $100k, it probably cost as much as a ship to use it on.Factory Photo
I think Wempe has a similar model at a fraction of the GO (nt)
02/14/2011 - 18:31
e
Nice, but is it not an anchor movement, or is it the real
02/14/2011 - 19:41
marine chronometer movement, with all that's making it a marine chronometer? The 'fake brand' Panerai, built by Don Cologni, with big amounts of money, advertising etc etc has also produced a 'marine chronometer', with anchor movement, to have in their yacht! Richemont, bought a small firm, that in total had made some hundreds watches, for the Italian Navy during WWII, with different kind of movements, they couldn't make any movements by themselves, among them Rolex and others. Last year Panerai bought a beautiful yacht, to use for important guests, I suppose. And perhaps look more maritime.... Anyhow, it's an old classic yacht that had been totally restored and is beautiful, inside and outside, except that they have put Panerai 'instruments', barometer, watch and also one "marine chronometer", all in steel, not in brass. The 'marine chronometer', whitch to me looks like a usual Swiss anchor movement, is put it in a box of wood! This is how a marine chronometer movement looks, by Kullberg: That's a marine chronometer movement in all it's beauty! I'll remember that Vacheron&Constantin also have made some 'chronometers', with anchor, and they are not marine chronometers. I think the only who still makes real marine chronometers, are Mercer's in UK. Cheers Doc
Hi Doc, the GO is ia real marine chronometer
02/16/2011 - 09:03
I remember reading that GO uncovered 13 of these vintage chronometers in very bad shape and restored them all.  These are being sold as a pair with a limited edition Pt. GO Senator Chronometer wristwatch.  I think this is part of the reason they set the price as such...and they were all sold very quickly. BR, Dan
I suspected that Dan,
02/17/2011 - 09:38
becaiuse they are Germans (!), and if Lange could put a fusee in a wristwatch GO and Lange surely would do it in a marine chronometer. Still, I have only seen the Panerai on picture it seems to be s anchor watch, only put in a box to look seamanlike put on the cabin table! Cheers Doc