A sublime PW with minature enamel by Poluzzi: Deer Hunt

I recently had the opportunity of photographing 2 amazing pocket watches with miniature enamel paintings by famed Geneva enamel artist Charles Poluzzi and one by his student Marthe Leclerc.

I will let the photos do the talking but the quality of the stroke, the miniature details, the colors the details all make the painting on the back cover a work of art in its own right.

The 3 watches together

A sublime PW with minature enamel by Poluzzi: Deer Hunt


However today I will present you with  a yellow gold pocket watch from 1952 representing Paul Bril's The Deer Hunt which is exhibited at the Louvre museum in Paris

Dear Hunt enamel by Poluzzi

Dear Hunt enamel by Poluzzi

Dear Hunt enamel by Poluzzi

Dear Hunt enamel by Poluzzi

Dear Hunt enamel by Poluzzi

Dear Hunt enamel by Poluzzi

the painting having inspired Poluzzi
A sublime PW with minature enamel by Poluzzi: Deer Hunt
Absolutely stunning, I will be looking forward to your next photos.
03/19/2013 - 18:24
heartheartheartheartheart
Amazing!!!!! I love the dear hunt.....
03/19/2013 - 22:17
Alex, thanks for posting. Do you know anything about the previous owner/s of the dear hunt and how it came to be in the Louvre?
Re: Wow wow wow!!!!
03/20/2013 - 03:37
Alex, Thanks for the photos , can you tell me more about the paintings ? 
painting on enamel is an extremely difficult art which demands not
03/20/2013 - 18:02
only skill and talent but a lot of experience.

The caseback is based on the grand feu Geneva enamel technique. The grand feu enamels used in the Geneva technique reach their point of fusion at an extremely high temperature, between 800°C and 900°C! 

The Geneva technique of miniature enamelling with a protective flux coating is undoubtedly that which requires the greatest expertise from the master enameller. The caseback is first coated with a white base enamel - that is extremely hard because of its high fusion point then undergoes a first firing at a temperature of around 900°C in order to be able to withstand the many subsequent firings in the furnace. 

On this white enamel base serving as a “background canvas”, the artist starts by tracing the outlines of the various motifs with a brush consisting of two or three marten’s hairs. This involved a few touches of colour on the chosen shade, placed in successive points in an extremely precise order, moving throughout the entire process from the softer shades to the purer, brighter ones. The extremely fine powders and pigments used for miniature enamel paintings are blended with oils such as lily flower oil, to make them easier to apply. 

When the miniature enamelled painting has been completed and fired for the last time, it is generally coated with two or three layers of a finishing flux consisting of a transparent enamel serving to protect the work from the potential effects of ageing. Following the final firing of this flux (at 800°C), a fine polish with an abrasive stone is performed, followed by the final polishing operation after the last vitrification in order to achieve the full radiance and pictorial splendour of the work.  Here are some photos of how this works (even though not specifically on the caseback of the Dear Hunt)

The art of enamel at its finest.
03/20/2013 - 17:45
Thank you for taking the time to post these!
Truly an amazing work of art
03/21/2013 - 11:05
The detail he acheived on his tiny canvas is unbelievable.  Thank you so much for the beautiful photos!
Impressive, truly impressive !
03/25/2013 - 11:18
nt