Thomas Crown Affair

Right off, I'll tell you that I'm referring to the 1968 original with Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway that I recently had the pleasure of viewing for only the 2nd time.  God, they sure knew how to make movies with a story back then!  Contrary to the 1999 remake when the girl got her man, or visa versa, the real storyline ended the only way it could crying.

Thomas Crown Affair
What may interest my friends in the Lounge was McQueen's cool style as expressed through clothes, art, planes, cars and....a pocket watch yes.  Not V&C unfortunately but style-wise could easily have been.

Thomas Crown Affair

Dunaway's Ferrari 275 NART Spyder was also stunning and makes my stomach flutter even today.

Thomas Crown Affair

Small bit of trivia, that car was 2nd at Sebring in 1967 before being consigned to a life in movies.  And of course, McQueen in Le Mans should be on anyone's very short list of ultimate car movies.

Please feel free to share your favorite watches featured in movies smiley.

10/16/2013 - 04:02
10/16/2013 - 16:03
10/16/2013 - 16:09
JB
10/16/2013 - 18:50
10/16/2013 - 21:09
when I think of watches a watch in a movie Pulp Fiction immediately
10/16/2013 - 12:42
pops into mind
Now that's a watch with history...
10/16/2013 - 18:29
WWI trench watch still used in Vietnam!  Producer was probably looking for something with smooth edges wink.  The piece certainly has great family history; the only thing missing was the usual closing line... "what's it worth"?
My favourite too
10/18/2013 - 16:53
This isn't quite the way I've been planning to store my watch or watches for my son... But the impact would be what I'm after when he gets it, so I need a storyline to pass on with the watch so the little f***** doesn't just flip it for peanuts. I don't have 'the watch'... Yet.. I don't have the storyline.. Yet... I do have the 'little f*****' though G
Yeah you don't want him going on some forum asking if his watch is
10/19/2013 - 00:06
real and how much it costs
James Bond = Rolex
10/16/2013 - 16:03
Great films but the best James Bond was and always will be Sean Connery!
Agreed Hamish
10/16/2013 - 18:36
Connery as the original James Bond character was true to the books; a bit brutish and totally ruthless.  The answer to which Rolex Bond wore can also be found in Flemming's novels; it was an Explorer and not the Submariner shown in the movie!
I think that in the 1st Flemming book Bond wore a GP!
10/16/2013 - 18:50
e
Re: I think that in the 1st Flemming book Bond wore a GP!
10/16/2013 - 20:12
And Daniel Craig wears an Omega (although Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale thought he wore a Rolex!)
Cool!
10/16/2013 - 20:51
Would love to hear more about this G-P connection, if you can recall Alex. I've been following Dell Deaton's fanatically thorough research on the Bond watches since he first published a story in the Feb09 WatchTime magazine.  Casino Royale was Flemming's first Bond novel but it wasn't until the 11th book written in 1962, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, that he actually named the brand of watch worn by 007; simply a "Rolex".  The physical description of the watch led Deaton and others to believe it was a 1016 Explorer that Flemming gave his character.  This was changed in the first movie, Dr. No, to a Submariner.   Regarding other watch brands, this is what Deaton had to say: His first novel, Casino Royale (1953), features a shadowy Swiss figure who is “a traveller in watches.” Fleming’s first script treatment (1959) for a proposed 007 motion picture provides the heroine with a cover story of working for customs in search of stolen Swiss watches. He gave other high-profile characters important timepieces by Patek Philippe in 1955, Cartier in 1956, and Girard-Perregaux in 1957. One story published in 1961 even used a radium-painted watch dial to test a geiger counter. 
Speaking of Le mans
10/16/2013 - 16:09
Didnt McQueen wear a Heuer Monaco
Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps
10/16/2013 - 16:53
There were a lot of good watches in this movie, but the star of the film (at least for me) was the VC Americain 1921 as worn by actor Josh Brolin.  He's the villain in the story, but I'd like to think he had a bit of redemption in his fine choice in watches.  indecision  Best, Robert
And he probably got to keep it!
10/16/2013 - 18:22
I've heard that wardrobe is usually given to the actors as part of their contract, and the actors often put an advance order in for the watch they'd like to have wink
Hi Dean
10/16/2013 - 18:50
If it's not too much trouble, could you let me know the source for that "entendre parler". Many thanks, Joseph
Re: Hi Dean
10/16/2013 - 21:09
Joseph, this story has been circulating for years and periodically reinforced with media stories.  One that I studied at length was a tax-evasion trial of a Hollywood actress who was accused of failing to declare the value of her costumes which were given to her upon completion of each movie.  She proved they were, in fact, business tools like a mechanic's wrenches, and not taxable.  The trial evidence was that this practice of granting the wardrobe to the actors upon completion of a movie was widespread, thus attracting the attention of the IRS. On watches specifically, I actually had a VC timepiece worn by Harrison Ford during a movie!  Nothing special, actually I didn't like it much and got rid of it years ago, but that led me to check into this aspect of "movie wardrobe" and again learned it was common practice to include watches with the suits, ties and shoes given over to the actor after filming.  As far as pre-ordering their watches prior to filming, these were the rumours about certain moviestar collectors seeking specific pieces.  Hope this helps,
Thanks for your reply, Dean (nt)
10/17/2013 - 05:08
 
Ian Fleming said it was more beautiful than the women in his books...
10/17/2013 - 15:09
Dean, how strange? You've prompted me to reflect upon an occasion when my VC watch was actually worn by Ian Fleming. It was sometime in 1962. My father had a business friend that met Ian Fleming on various occasions. I remember we all met-up in a prestigious office suite just off Oxford Street in London. I had taken my newly acquired watch along as the friend had expressed a wish to see it. To my surprise the watch became the centre of attraction with Ian Fleming placing it on his wrist and showing great reluctance to take it off! It was at this point that he said the watch was more beautiful than the women in his books!!! We didn't meet again so I've no idea if Ian actually purchased a VC watch, he said he would! Sadly Ian died two years later on August, 12th, 1964 - just one day before my birthday. I'II always remember it as the watch was a birthday present.  So, at least one VC watch was worn by Ian Fleming... Tony
Re: Ian Fleming said it was more beautiful than the women in his books...
10/17/2013 - 16:59
That's quite a classic, Tony! Very VC...simple, elegant and serene. No wonder Fleming was reluctant to part with it. Joseph
Ian Flemming, Tony C...that watch has been on some prestegious wrists!
10/17/2013 - 17:44
smiley
Alex, I always leave the best till last...
10/17/2013 - 19:10
Now then, you've reminded me of something else. In 1962 I was dating a beautiful young woman that was appearing as a 'Windmill Girl' at The Windmill Theatre just off Shaftesbury Avenue in London's Soho district. The theatre drew large crowds and quickly became one of London's must see attractions. I'II leave it to you to reason why it was so popular? Unfortunately, the show, originated in Paris called the 'Revuedeville' closed in 1964 after running for 32 years! During our romance she also placed my watch on her wrist and, of course, there were others - no names, no pack-drill! Thankfully Alex, you didn't drop it when we met-up in London a few months back and what a very pleasant evening that turned out to be... Pleasant memoriesheartand happy times... Tony
Tony, thank-you so much
10/17/2013 - 20:34
for sharing these stories, you are such a gentleman raconteur heart.   You wouldn't have a old snapshot of your Windmill Girl to share?  Purely for research purposes angel. Your experience with Ian Flemming is thrilling to hear.  Flemming had disclosed his inspiration for 007 was Canadian Bill Stephenson, who we also know as the agent code name "Intrepid".  Stephenson's real-life adventures (he also helped set up the American CIA after the war) would certainly give the fictional Bond character a run for the money cool. During WWII, Flemming's pet project was the German Enigma code machine.  I would love to know the truth about the failed Dieppe Raid in August 1942, which cost nearly a thousand Canadian lives (and almost 2,000 captured) in what was described as a "practice invasion" for Normandy.  Current research now suggests was a giant ruse engineered by Flemming to capture German Naval Intelligence HQ located in the town, along with their cipher books and the latest 4-rotor Enigma machines.  Flemming was actually waiting offshore on a British ship to personally take possession of anything recovered. If you would indulge me a little further blush, one of the few successful operations during Dieppe was a raid by Lovat Scouts, joined with Canadian and American commandos, on a German position.  I mention this only because tomorrow Mrs. TT and I are donning the backpacks and heading into the Rockies to our favorite destination; Tonquin Valley.  We'll be staying in the very cabin where the Lovat Scouts trained in mountain warfare during 1943 before being sent to Italy.  I've even read the daily log books from that time, still in the cabin, with hilarious anecdotes of their daily misadventures. Thanks again for sharing, Tony yes.
Re: Tony, thank-you so much
10/17/2013 - 21:49
To add a little more on this event from a literary point of view: Another famous author was on this raid..William Golding, who landed successfully and found himself firing rockets at Balbec which Marcel Proust had immortalized in Jeunes Filles en Fleur . Apparently it had a significant psychological effect on him. The research Dean mentioned about seizing the Enigma codes was done by the Montreal historian David O'Keefe who waded through a very large number of unclassified documents (over 100,000) in his research. His book on the Dieppe raid will be released in a few weeks. (That should provide a lot of the information you're looking for, Dean.) Certainly the desire to obtain the Enigma machine and codes were a strong motivating factor in putting on the raid especially after it was postponed, but the motives for the raid were multiple and complex. As for the Enigma and the code books, I do not believe they were in fact recovered. It took another 6 months at Bletchly Park for the "boffins", including Alan Turing, to break the 4 rotor device. Another aspect of this raid was the attempt to capture the German Freya system which was a radar-like (or Radio Directional Finder) device. This aspect as well, was only partly successful. The story of this part of the Dieppe raid can be found in Jack Nissen's (he was the radar expert on the raid) book: "Winning the Radar War" and R.V. Jones "Most Secret War". Who says we only talk about watches here! JB
Finally, a V&C connection!
10/18/2013 - 00:03
Joseph, we're quite a team yes.  It's true, Flemming had to return home from Dieppe empty-handed, but the British denied even his presence until the most recent wave of mandatory declassifcations released a great deal of new information on this long-ago event in history.  Considering what his death or capture would have meant at the time, I'm surprised Flemming was allowed out at all...but, aside from the usual cyanide pill, he probably had a "minder" close by with a loaded pistol surprise. With your mention of the German Freya radar, I thought immediately of it's sister Wurzberg target radar.  It was that captured technology the British adapted for use on board those secret Fighter Direction Tender (FDT) ships used off the coast of Normandy during D-Day landings to detect and intercept enemy aircraft.  You may recall I described my HS2 deck watch that served aboard FDT 217 here: June 6, 1944.
Photographed on S.S.Orsova circa 1959...
10/17/2013 - 22:01
Dean, following a search in various photograph albums I have managed to uncover/recover a photograph of the 'Windmill Girl'. The shot was taken on board ship and features my parents, Maureen and myself. We met in the West End at a photo-shoot. In my early days I did quite alot of modelling for several well known companies. It's interesting to read the results of your research concerning Ian Fleming. Do, please, take your camera to Tonquin Valley and let's have a few snippets from the daily logbook. Have a safe journey - see you when you get back... Tony
You're right, Joseph.....we don't just do watches 'ere!...
10/17/2013 - 22:40
Your notes are most interesting and indeed enlightening. Isn't it amazing how a subject gathers pace and often takes a number of different directions as a result. If somebody had said to me that I would be posting a photograph taken on board S. S. Orsove in 1959 - I would never have believed it!  There, that's life on the hour Lounge and long may it continue. You're right Joseph - there's an awful lot that makes us tickheart... Best wishes Tony
That's a great photo, Tony
10/17/2013 - 22:48
And if you don't mind a little flattery...I thought you looked like the young Jussi Bjoerling! Joseph
That's marvelous Tony, thanks again (nt)
10/17/2013 - 23:45
nt