Time Lab announces the new Geneva Seal critera: major changes

 Today November 9, Time Lab the independent official body  part of the Geneva authorities and which awards the Hallmark of  Geneva announced earlier this evening the  modifications on the hallmark criteria.
 
The major change is that the Hallmark of Geneva will no longer be given to a movement but to the timepiece as a whole.
 
Other than some small technical changes the Hallmark of Geneva requirements on the movement remain the same.
 
The new criteria concentrate on 3 major elements
 
Links between movement and case
 
  • all elements which connect the case to the movement (holder rings, corrector buttons, pushers etc…) will need to respect a certain number of criteria regarding their finish.
 
 
Tests on cased watch
 
  • Water resistance: the water resistance shall be tested to the level announced by the brand. The minimum requirement being 3ATM and -0.5ATM which corresponds to the pressure undergone in planes.
 
  • Testing of the function throughout one complete cycle: each of the watch’s functions are tested (ex: a perpetual calendar is set on Feb 26 and tested to make sure all indications are still correct on March 1, a chronograph is tested to make sure that the counters, start stop and reset function correctly etc…)
 
  • Accuracy: each watch is tested under normal wearing conditions for 7 days and the maximum acceptable deviation is 1 minute. If the watch has extra functions these extra functions should not have an adverse effect on the accuracy. For example if a chronograph is tested the chronograph function will be on for 24 hours.
 
  • Power reserve. The power reserve of the watch will be tested to make certain it corresponds to what is announced by the brand
 
 
Controls
 
The Time Lab team shall frequently control (at least once a month) the brands to make sure that the criteria are followed for each and every watch which is awarded the Hallmark of Geneva.

Time Lab announces the new Geneva Seal critera: major changes

Time Lab announces the new Geneva Seal critera: major changes
Accuracy Criteria Finally!
11/09/2011 - 23:03
"Accuracy: each watch is tested under normal wearing conditions for 7 days and the maximum acceptable deviation is 1 minute. If the watch has extra functions these extra functions should not have an adverse effect on the accuracy. For example if a chronograph is tested the chronograph function will be on for 24 hours." Doing the maths, that equates to an acceptable average deviation of almost 8.6 sec/day. COSC allows 10 sec/day over their 16-day test period for movements tested in isolation.  Note to COSC; people buy their watches completed enlightened.  Testing cased watches apparently introduces additional challenges if the 2009 and 2011 International Observatory Concours was anything to judge by; the failure rates were alarming! So, congratulations to the GS organization for making the move to objective and relevant standards of timekeeping smiley.  Alex, do you know when the exact testing procedures will be made public?
Found it...
11/10/2011 - 00:20
Please forgive my rough translation and correct any mistakes blush: 9.2 Precision of timing • The tests are carried out over one period of 7 consecutive days. • The manual and automatic watches are placed on a simulator. • The watches carry out a cycle of 1 turns/min for 14 hours and stops in a random position for 10 hours each day. • At the end of the 7 days, a comparative measurement will be taken on the positioning of the minutes hand. Process: • States 0 and 7 are controlled by visual comparison. • These states are compared to a reference time. • With state 7, the watch should not vary of more than one minute. • With state 7, the incrementing of the dates is tested. Note: • All the watches will have to be wound up fully and, for the watches with dates, are set at February 26 of the leap year. • The manual watches should be wound up for the 24 hours. • The automatic watches will not be wound during the test. • The chronograph function will have to be engaged during the first 24 hours.  
Thank you Alex and Dean for the scoop and all the info
11/15/2011 - 17:53
the GS is headed in the right direction...
the new criteria will be applcable starting June 2012 but a
11/10/2011 - 01:11
VC will be soon presented  already respecting these criteria and the inhouse tests have the movement off by 1 second....per week!!!!
Oh my god!
11/10/2011 - 02:05
Eat that, PP Seal devil
fantastic !! awaiting the next SIHH novelties ! nt.
11/10/2011 - 07:30
nt.
Re: the new criteria will be applcable starting June 2012 but a
11/10/2011 - 12:25
Looking forward to seeing that!
Hardly.
11/10/2011 - 06:27
The watch can gain ten minutes per day for six days, then lose 59 minutes on the seventh day and pass the test.
dean, thanks for doing the math , i was thinking if the criteria is ..
11/10/2011 - 07:34
better than the COSC certification.
Certainly different
11/11/2011 - 02:26

It makes sense in the modern era of wrist watches to drop the timing measurements in positions, although I'm sure they must still be regulated in positions for accuracy.  Similar with daily recording of variance, as the cumulative error after one week will reveal which timepieces are up to standard.  These I would say are neutral.  On the positive side, timing the entire watch including case, and running the complications, is a great improvement.  On the negative side; one week is a bit short IMHO - half that of COSC - and I was hoping the of shock and magnetism testing introduced in the reborn Observatory trials would find their way into the GS. I wonder what influence COSC had on these new GS standards; they are a partner in TimeLab after all.

Thanks for the hot off thepress info
11/09/2011 - 23:26
To be honest, I read a lot in here I think I and a lot of others took for granted was alreadynbeing done routinely... And maybe it was by some Brands. And it seems the minimum we would want, not just to achieve the GS... G
Alex, a few questions for you:
11/10/2011 - 06:54
a) Do recent VC's more or less conform to the new changes? For example, for currently manufactured VC's, would they be 'different' June 2012 onwards in terms of movement, accuracy, case, strap etc.? b) For VC's which do not have the GS (Malte Tourbillon, Overseas); will they still get a Time Lab certificate for the other criteria? Also, will their movements have to pass the Time Lab accuracy criteria even though they dont qualify for the GS? I hope this does not become some sort of a Seal war with PP. As Doc once said in an earlier post, the name on the dial should be enough. The essence of the brand should not get lost in all this.
tI would think that other than the elements linking
11/10/2011 - 08:23
case and movement more or less respect this criteria. The Geneva Seal is a "take it or leave it" meaning you can't certification on some elements and not on others. 
Re: tI would think that other than the elements linking
11/10/2011 - 10:19
Does this mean that with all the additions, the certification is given only to those pieces where the movement is in-house and where assembled in Geneva? In other words, is the Overseas still excluded?
The seal is not only given to inhouse calibers but VC applies only
11/10/2011 - 14:49
For its inhouse movements which means that the OS Will not be getting the seal. One reason being that the movements used in the OS were not conceived from the begining for the seal
Faire mieux si possible, ce qui est toujours possible...
11/10/2011 - 09:14
Congratulations VC. It will be nice to discover the 2012 novelties soon with this GS and that incredible accuracy 1s/week. Thanks Alex for these informations. Liger 
Some well needed improvements
11/11/2011 - 12:44
Especially the accuracy bit is very welcome imo. Will other criterias be added in the near future or are we looking at another 100 years without adjustments? smiley
Thanks Alex
11/11/2011 - 20:31
Geneva Seal needs to evolve and such a seal which implies so much companies is not easy to "move". It goes in the right direction, congratulations to the Geneva Authorities for this imprevement, which went finally... fast. (and it has to be so).